Why So Surprised?

Short post today, but I’ve just really gotta get this off my chest.

Very few things upset/disappoint/sadden me as much as my fellow Christians exhibiting outrage when persecuted. There is no humility in outrage. There is no love in outrage. There is no witness in outrage. The only times outrage was clearly justified within New Testament Scripture were when God’s Church or temple were defiled (when Christ overturned the vendors’ tables in the temple, when Paul called Christians to excommunicate those among them bringing evil into the Body, etc).

People, this is what we committed to when we chose to walk with Christ. Christ warned us time and time again that, hey, if you choose to walk with me you’re gonna have a tough time at points. It’s to be expected that people who don’t know Christ will act as, well, people who don’t know Christ (1 Cor. 5:12). So why do we act so surprised and angry when we get some flak?

I yearn for a day when Christian culture in America realizes that we have no greater opportunity to be a witness for Christ than to respond to all forms of persecution with the love, humility, and grace first shown to us by Christ. Please, I implore you today to dare to try to be like the Lamb who didn’t even begin to protest when falsely accused, tortured, and crucified. Let’s show the world something radical: an unnatural love it cannot know outside of Christ.

I’m In Africa!

Wow. I’m actually here. I keep re-realizing that I’m finally in Africa. For the first time in five years I’m actually back in the place that I feel God ultimately calling me to in my career. Every time that I re-realize that I’m really in Africa, that I’m really here on this adventure, I honestly can’t help but get the biggest smile. I love it. It just feels me with the greatest joy. I love Africa and I seriously can’t wait to begin my career here whenever God allows that.

So, right now I’ll tell you a bit about the start to my time here in Nairobi. Working with Africa Inland Mission, I’m with a pretty diverse group of people from all over the world. It’s been pretty neat interacting and talking to people from Canada, the UK, Germany, and other parts of the US here in Kenya. Right now I’m at a guest house going through orientation and training in Nairobi before going to our ministry location elsewhere in the city.

Some things about my experience in this temporary living situation:
I have an awesome British roommate who is thoroughly entertaining. His name is James King. He told me this morning that he has the most biblical name. There is the book of James, the books of First and Second Kings, and the King James Version of the Bible. I must say, he does have a good case made. Hahah. In conversation today and last night I have learned the following phrases from him (and more):
The Cheese Eating Surrender Monkeys – The French. This one made me laugh soooo hard. “We whipped the Cheese Eating Surrender Monkeys in the Battle of Agincourt.”
Risk it for a chocolate biscuit – If you wanna risk something for a big possible gain. “Yea, the bloke decided to shoot on goal instead of pass to a teammate on his free kick. I guess he wanted to risk it for a chocolate biscuit.”
Lovely jubbly – You might use this expression about a drink or food that you really enjoyed. “That dinner was just lovely jubbly.”
I could murder that – If you really ‘fancy’ something. “Oh I could murder that pint of ale. It was so good.”
Yea, this guy is pretty great. Haha. He’s going up to serve in the north of the country though, so I won’t be with him after today. But my time with him has been fun.

I’m also rooming with my ministry partner Jason Lambert (from my mom’s land down south, Georgia). I think we’re going to get along really well. From what I’ve seen so far, it seems we have some really complementary strengths and characters. We move into our place tomorrow. We’re super excited to just start living life alongside the guys we’ll be ministering to. Jason’s interested in working in business with a positive social impact, so it’s been cool hearing some of his hopes for that since it’s a common interest of ours.

During our training, the missionary’s kids were out in the backyard playing. He mentioned that they were chameleon hunting. As soon as he said that, I wanted to go out and chameleon hunt with them! Who wants to study cultural sensitivity when you can be chameleon hunting with a 6 and 8 year old!? Lol. What’s funny here is apparently Kenyans are like deathly afraid of chameleons. They look at PJ (the missionary) like he’s crazy for letting his kids play with chameleons. Apparently there are some beliefs that they’re incredibly venomous. There is also a proverb/belief type thing that once one bites your hair it will never let go. Was pretty funny to me. I’m sure we have pretty funny fears in the U.S. too though that foreigners don’t understand. Who knows what they are though. Lol.

I had tea today with a German woman ministering in the northeast of the Democratic Republic of Congo (where I’d like to work in my future). The first awesome thing for you to note in that sentence is the tea part. We have a morning and an afternoon tea every day here. IT’S AWESOME! I feel like I’m in Hobbiton having first and second breakfastes. Pippin and Merry would love it here. (I dearly hope you understand my Lord of the Rings references…Lol) But besides that, I was able to speak a little bit with her about the DRC. I was able to actually learn from someone who has seen the damage done by rebels and the LRA firsthand and who has seen things improve in some ways from previous points. I was also able to discuss some development things I’ve studied and hear what she sees a need for in the society and what the failings in the area have been. Toni (the German) has been in the DRC for over 30 years. She was there when it was still Zaire. This time was awesome. Toni was awesome. God is awesome.

Ultimately today, in the words from LEGO Movie, everything is awesome. I’m so grateful that God has brought me here in this moment and that he used you people to supply my every need in preparation for this trip. Life is good and, I must say, I am incredibly happy. This is most definitely where I am supposed to be right now.

Expectations

I’ll begin this blog with a bit of a status update for you all on my progress towards my soon approaching departure for 1.5 months of ministry in Nairobi, Kenya. God has been so incredibly good. Two and a half months ago I had about $5000 to raise for this trip. When I reached my original deadline on May 2nd, I was only at $1500. Needless to say, I was incredibly discouraged. I went to God that day with my frustrations and just vented to Him. “Yea God, sure, I trust you. It’s having to depend on your people to give that scares me. I mean, I guess you could just make the money appear out of nowhere if you need to…Technically…Since you’re God. Meh.” That was my prayer.

But God reminded me that He is the God of miracles and the Lord of His people. He will use those who are willing. He will do incredible things with them and will always meet our needs. That day, I received an anonymous donation of $500 with a short note. “May God bless you and use you this summer. All things come from God!” That was exactly what I needed that day. And God knew that. He used a beautiful heart to meet my needs. He does that stuff. But he took me to my limits first. He made me reach to Him in desperate prayer. He stretched my faith far. He grew me. That’s what life is all about. Growing alongside God and doing what we can to help others do the same. Over the next few days, thousands of dollars poured in from other hearts seeking to be instruments of God’s love. Now I am merely about $200 away from my end goal (and that’s after a rise in ticket costs lifted my expenses by about $500). Holy crazy, God blessed me with his people.

What I took from this experience was the beginning of an understanding of what it means to really trust God and to be a part of His Body. I began to realize that he will test us, take us through trials, and grow us in everything. I was reminded that God really does work all things out, and that His people are instrumental in Him doing so. This is what it means to be the Church, to be the hands, feet, arms, eyes, and ears of God’s Body. This fellowship and support of each other and the way we come through for God’s work in the end no matter what. However many problems and faults we have as the Body of Christ, we’re still His people and God will still use us. I was reminded of that. And that’s incredibly important for us to remember. It can be easy for us to just see all the faults in God’s Church, but we need to be celebrating the joys of being a part of God’s Kingdom here on Earth. We need to be appreciative of the place that we have this Body, this Kingdom, of our incredible God and Leader. We are all in this together, like it or not, and we need to depend on each other. We need to trust each other. We need to confess to each other and find refuge in this beautiful Body. The role of the Church in Scripture is one of the things that sets the Body of Christ apart from all other religions. It’s beautiful.

Today in my devotional, the author had some things to say about our expectations within this Christian life. My expectation when I began this journey was that God would meet all my needs with maybe a bit of a struggle; that this would be a fun experience that would give me a peak into my future career in missions and development in Africa. My expectation was that God would grow me, but I didn’t think I’d be pushed to the limits I have, especially before I’m even there in Nairobi. But our expectations rarely seem to line up exactly with God’s plans. Check out what the author of my devotional had to say about his time in ministry in Sudan:

“I found it discouraging that language leaders weren’t interested in saying the sinner’s prayer after two years of life on life with them. Neighbors were kind and hospitable, but not ready for a Bible study. Thoughts of Why am I here? and This isn’t what I signed up for started rapping in my brain…Why was life such a struggle? Why couldn’t I be content and satisfied?

Because I’d forgotten that it was my part just to obey, that Jesus is my just reward-that he can do as He sees fit with me, my family, and the work in Sudan…And only Jesus makes it worth it.

I didn’t expect God to bring me all this way to change what He saw in me. But he has. I needed Sudan more than Sudan needed me, and I didn’t expect that. I thought God was bringing me to Sudan to change Sudan…

What do you expect dying to self will feel like? Do you think it will be pleasant? Painless? Problem free? Do you expect people to understand, support you, praise you, clap for you? Do you expect the devil to cheer and every demon in hell to yield to your noble aspirations?…Or do you expect God to wring the self out of you in a painful and lengthy process using circumstance and shattered expectations-and then surprise you with how good it feels to have His image stamped deeply onto yours?”

It’s our part to obey. It’s not our responsibility to save souls, to change lives, or to bring revolution in society. God’s got that taken care of. When we assume responsibility for things like bringing the money needed, saving people, changing people’s attitudes and hearts, when we assume responsibility for doing anything other than loving God and loving people, we burn out. Taking on God’s responsibilities is an easy way to realize just how merely human we are and a surefire way to burnout and despair. But just saying, Here I am God. Do your thing, that takes so much less. That’s actually doable. Just trust God in what He’s doing. He won’t call you to failure. There is some purpose behind all things that God does. Now, not all struggles are even necessarily from God. We live in a world where evil is a very present reality. But “God uses all things for the good of those who love Him”. Remember that. Stop worrying and just live. Just love God and try to trust that He’s got all this stuff covered. 

Trust God. Ironically it’s one of the hardest things to do in life, but also one of the hardest things to live with a lack of.